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SUBJECT OF THE MONTH

YOUR STUDY, YOUR LIFE

The most important requirement for effective study is the proper mental attitude and a driving desire to learn. Picture to yourself as vividly as possible the consequences of your failure to learn—flunking out, opinions of family and friends, lowered income throughout life because of incompetence. Then think of what may happen if you do particularly well—respect from family and friends, possible scholarships, offers of jobs leading to important and responsible positions.
Get interested in the subjects by learning something about it, tying it in with other courses, talking it over with fellow students. Be assured that if the course is required as part of a curriculum of professional training, the course is necessary. Try to discover why.

Go to class; be alert. Make a serious effort to stay right with the lecture. Adopt a cooperative and receptive mental attitude rather than a belligerent one. Perhaps you will develop more enthusiasm for the course if you sit in one of the front rows, where you will be forced to pay attention. Develop a hatred for sitting at the back of the class.
Find yourself a quiet place to study, with plenty of light and desk space that is free from distractions, including radios, TV, phones, walkmans and pictures of girl friends or boy friends. (The desk is for work; put the pictures in the albums and only visit them during the holidays.) Study conscientiously, keep at it; sit with your back to the door and reject interruptions. The time you save will enable you to enjoy occasional bull sessions without worrying because you aren’t studying.

Budget your time wisely. Make out a study schedule and stick to it for at least two weeks. Get adequate sleep, regular moderate exercise, and some recreation. Seville Chapman, Stanford University, California, USA. August 1946



SUBJECT OF THE MONTH
PHYSICS


WHAT THE SUBJECT IS ALL ABOUT
Physics is the basic physical science. It deals with such things as mechanics (force, energy, motion), sound, heat, light, electricity, and atomic structure. In physics we are concerned not so much with what is so but rather with why it is so. In fact, physics has been described as the science of “why things work.” The word "physics" is from an old Greek word meaning "nature." Everything happening around you every day is part of the study of physics, so it is very important.

WHY STUDY THIS SUBJECT
1. It is a fascinating subject

2. It is at the root of all technological inventions

3. It enables us to have a better grasp of our universe.

A degree in physics provides opportunities for challenging and exciting careers in many professions, because physics teaches skills that are transferable to these professions. These skills include problem solving, analytical abilities, mathematical modeling, design and interpretation of experiments, research experience, and communication skills. The physics major is also excellent preparation for students planning to enter science related businesses, MBA School, Medical School, or Law School. Medical Schools seek out students with majors in physics because of the high-tech nature of medical care.

HOW BEST TO STUDY THE SUBJECT
You learn more physics by studying it for an hour a day than by studying it for ten hours on a week end, and it takes less time. Furthermore, you will get more from the middle-of-the-week classes Don’t get behind. Keep up with your work. It’s much easier to learn your lessons from day to day than it is to half-learn them all at once on the day before the exam. If the prospect of an assignment is forbidding, begin on it; you may get more done than you expected.

Plan to study physics as soon after class as possible, while you still remember things that probably will be forgotten twenty-four hours later. You may find it a good idea to study physics when your mind is fresh, before you work on subjects requiring less concentration.

Study to understand the material, not just to read an assignment. Go slowly Physics can’t be read like a novel or even like a history lesson. (A physics assignment is often only a half-dozen pages rather than a half-dozen chapters.) Try to think of applications of the material as you read it and of problems to which the formulas apply. Try to correlate the material with your previous knowledge and with other courses. Mat

Physics can be learned by seeing, hearing, reading, writing, and talking. Do not overlook the chance of talking things over with your friends. An excellent study procedure is for two students to study a week’s material together and then give each other an oral exam on it. Trying to explain something to a critical friend will show if you really know it. Don’t delude yourself by saying, “I know it but I can’t explain it,” for if you do understand it, you can explain it. As a matter of fact, a good test of your understanding is furnished by the ease with which you can explain something. When you understand it well enough, you can explain it easily.

QUALIFICATIONS YOU CAN OBTAIN WITH THE SUBJECT
Mechanical engineering
Electrical and Electronics engineering
Computer engineering and Computer science
Civil engineering, Chemical engineering
Physics, pure, applied and industrial
Metallurgical and Materials engineering
Geology, mining and petroleum studies
Surveying and Building Technology
Aeronautics engineering and Pilot
Agricultural Engineering and Agricultural Courses
Technological courses, Environmental Science
Medicine and Pharmacy
Astronomy, Radiology, Meteorology, Education

WHAT YOU CAN DO WITH A DEGREE IN PHYSICS
Consulting,
Self Employment
Project Engineer
Project Manager
Factory and Plant Manager
Medical Physicist
Technology Scientist
Researcher and Research Analyst
Laboratory Technologist and Technician
Meteorologist
Teaching
Plus many more

INDUSTRIES AND SECTORS YOU CAN WORK
Oil and Gas Companies,
Exploration and Drilling
Construction Companies
Manufacturing Companies
IT, Hardware and Software companies
Education, Research
Government, Major hospitals
Aeronautics and Engineering companies
Consulting and Project Management
Power generation, mining
Plus many more

BEST SCHOOLS IN THE SUBJECT
University of Nigerian Nsukka,
University of Lagos,
The Federal Universities of Technology,
Ahmadu Bello University,
IMT Enugu.
Yaba College of Technology,
Harvard University,
Princeton University,
MIT,
Cornel University,
University of Yale,
Oxford University.

OUTSTANDING PEOPLE IN THE SUBJECT
Engr. Hyginus U. Ugwu,
Debo Adeyewa (satellite meteorology) ,
Olatunde Popoola (Geophysicist) ,
Babatunde Abiodun (Atmospheric physics)
Albert Eisten,
Galilio Galilei,
Sir Isaac Newton,
Benjamin Franklin,
James Watt,
Michael Faraday,
Joseph Gibbs,
Wilhelm Rontgen,
Max Planck,
Charles Wilson,
Professor Abdus Salam,
Nobel Laureate in Physics in 1979

BOOKS ON THE SUBJECT
Principles of Physics by Nelson and Parker
O’Level Physics by Abbot
Physics: Principles and Problems by Zitzewitz and Glencoe
Modern Physics by Trinklein

RESOURCES ON THE SUBJECT
National Mathematical Center, Abuja
Trained Teachers and Professors
Established Schools, Laboratories and workshops
The Polytechnics, Colleges of Education and Universities
Research Institutes and Professional Associations
Fellow Students
dir.yahoo.com/science/physics/
www.physicsworld.com
www.practicalphysics.org
www.physicscentral.com
www.physicsclassroom.com
www.easyphysics.net
www.library.thinkquest.org


Physics graduates and their job holdings

Adam Daire, BSC, Core Technology Scientist
Salvador Tiscareno, BSC, Electro-Optic Engineer
Paul Davis, BSC, Applications Engineer
Eric Lee, BSC, Etch Manufacturing Tools Project Leader
Sergio Valdes, BSC, Reactor Coolant System Engineer
Mark Tritch, BSC, Project Engineer
Michelle Gross, BSC, Senior Noise Engineer
Carl Landis, MSC, Associate Medical Physicist
Gregory Rigden, MSC, Senior Scientist
Jason Coleman, MSC, Senior Programmer
Steven Calderone, MSC, Programmer Analyst
Michelle Rubin, MSC, Program Manager
Kimberly Wiefling, MSC, Manufacturing Engineering Project Leader
Howard Wallace, MA, Radiation Protection Administrator
Marshall Burns, PhD, President and Founder
Alfred DeAngelis, PhD, Research Physicist
Martin Luling, PhD, Research Scientist
Roger Hoyt, PhD, Program Director

Academics

Jennifer Groppe, MSC, Physics Teacher
Carlane B. Pittman, MA, Director for Outreach
Paul Martenis, MA, Teacher
M. Guhathakurta, PhD, Associate Research Professor
Anthony M. Johnson, PhD, Professor and Chairperson
Kimberly Titus, PhD, Research Assistant Professor

Government

Sharon Lappin, BSC, Intermediate Highway Designer
Randolph Wojcik, BSC, Physicist
Keith Ofsowitz, BSC, System Safety Engineer
Michelle O'Brien, MSC, Physicist
Clara Asmail, MSC, Physicist
Harold Chadsey, MSC, Astronomer
Stephen Karis, MSC, Research Physicist

Military

Major Matthew H. Briggs, BSC, Aircraft Commander and Instructor for the C-130 Hercules, USAF
(Source: society of physics students, USA).

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